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Polynesian Princess, They Call Me

Some time ago, we wrote about a rather amazing phenomenon from Walt Disney World’s past: the tearoom fashion modeling trend found at Lake Buena Vista in the 1970s. But even before the Lake Buena Vista Village was constructed, these swanky luncheons were taking place at the Polynesian Village Resort.

In August of 1972, The Eyes & Ears of Walt Disney World profiled the resort’s Sign and Pictorial Shop. Located in the North Service Area, near the Magic Kingdom, this shop provided handcrafted signs and artwork for a variety of Walt Disney World facilities. And look what they were working on:

"Supervisor John Rushing (right) tells EYES & EARS, 'We carefully check everything that leaves the shop, looking closely for color, workmanship and detail.' John and Pete Naughtin make a few last-minute changes catching details that most eyes wouldn't even spot!" - Eyes & Ears, 1972

“Supervisor John Rushing (right) tells EYES & EARS, “We carefully check everything that leaves the shop, looking closely for color, workmanship and detail.” John and Pete Naughtin make a few last-minute changes catching details that most eyes wouldn’t even spot!” – Eyes & Ears, 1972

Informal modeling!!

Yes, ladies, you too can witness the latest in island fashions from Polynesian Princess daily from noon ’til two! How much would I love a poster of that sign? So, so much.

Not as much as I’d like this one, though:

"'A steady hand is something I've got to keep,' says John Barnett who must carefully paint English letters - with a Chinese flair no less! John's sign is a gold leaf display whose center portion is 23 Kt. gold. Lettering takes nearly four hours and if a mistake is made, this is one sign that can't be thrown out!" - Eyes & Ears, 1972

“‘A steady hand is something I’ve got to keep,’ says John barnett who must carefully paint English letters – with a Chinese flair no less! John’s sign is a gold leaf display whose center portion is 23 Kt. gold. Lettering takes nearly four hours and if a mistake is made, this is one sign that can’t be thrown out!” – Eyes & Ears, 1972

Why yes, that’s a sign for the Eastern Winds – the fabled Chinese junk once moored at the Polynesian Resort’s dock. As the most exotic craft on the Seven Seas Lagoon, the Eastern Winds provided the perfect locale for late-night cocktail cruises and the most spectacular viewing location for the Electrical Water Pageant or the Fantasy in the Sky Fireworks.

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1 comment to Polynesian Princess, They Call Me

  • Professional Dreamer

    Its too bad a lot of the unique transportation at Walt Disney World like this Chinese junk, the Eastern Winds, were retired. With a Disneyland in Hong Kong and Shanghai, I would think they would promote a new junk at this park. The Polynesian had a great seafood salad. I miss the steam trains out at Fort Wilderness. PD

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